IMCA publishes security measures and emergency response guidance

Associations, Books, Health and Safety, Insurance and Reinsurance, Marine Insurance, News, Oil Spill, Piracy and Terrorism, Pollution, Ports & Terminals, Safety and Security — By on May 6, 2015 at 5:27 AM
Jane Bugler

Jane Bugler

The threat to maritime security from piracy, terrorism, criminal acts, and hostage and kidnapping threats continues to pose challenges to ships’ owners, masters and crew members, and has resulted in  the International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA) (Booth S16 at OTC) publishing ‘Security Measures and Emergency Response Guidance’ (IMCA SEL 037, IMCA M 226).

“Safety is of paramount importance, and our document aims to provide guidance to masters, company and ship security officers and other crew members and staff, on security measures and emergencies onboard vessels when underway, at anchor or alongside in their own or another country, and also for staff in shore side offices, ” explains IMCA’s Technical Director, Jane Bugler. “It is intended to reinforce and support existing company and vessel security procedures or provide a framework around which these can be developed where they are not yet in place, such as for new build vessels.

“This is in line with IMCA strategic goals of promoting the tools and information to help members undertake all aspects of risk management across all areas of their operations. The guidance is based on a ‘layered defence’ philosophy which embraces the concept of using a number of different but collaborative and co-ordinated security measures to deal with security threats proportionately and effectively. The guidance is not only relevant to current existing high risk areas (HRA) as defined by government bodies, but can be applied at any stage where for whatever reason, security measures might need to be adopted.”

Running to nearly 40 pages, the Guidance covers general security guidelines and security levels; ship protection measures; STCW security training requirements; risk assessment; building security measures; and cyber security measures, before a six-page section on terrorism, piracy and violent criminal acts. This section encompasses the actual situation; layered defence, ships/installations, terrorism, piracy, security measures for ships, communications; vessel ship to shore; medical treatment; citadel procedures; and firefighting.

Moving on to hostage taking and kidnapping, there are specific sections on kidnap and ransom plan, kidnap process, confinement; family support; outside agencies; legal aspects; kidnap response strategy; and disclosure of information.  Other sections deal with stowaways; bomb threats; and sources of information and guidance. And the appendices cover recommended cyber security measures; and an example of telephone bomb threat – aide mémoire.

The guidance can be downloaded free of charge from the IMCA website by members and non-members alike and printed copies are available for £5:00 for members; and £10:00 for non-members from publications@imca-int.com and from IMCA at 52 Grosvenor Gardens, London SW1W 0AJ, UK. Tel: +44 (0)20 7824 5520; Fax: +44 (0)20 7824 5521.

Further information
Further information on IMCA and its work on behalf of its 1000+ member companies in over 60 countries is available from Booth S16 at OTC, from www.imca-int.com and imca@imca-int.com. The association has LinkedIn and Facebook groups and its Twitter handle is @IMCAint
 
About IMCA

  • IMCA is an international association with well over a thousand members in more than 60 countries representing offshore, marine and underwater engineering companies. IMCA has four technical divisions, covering marine/specialist vessel operations, offshore diving, hydrographic survey and remote systems and ROVs, plus geographic sections for the Asia-Pacific, Central & North America, Europe & Africa, Middle East & India and South America regions. As well as a core focus on safety, the environment, competence and training, IMCA seeks to promote its members’ common interests, to resolve industry-wide issues and to provide an authoritative voice for its members.
  • IMCA Vision & Strategy. As a result of work and collective input in 2013, IMCA has redefined its stated core purpose to be “Improving performance in the marine contracting industry”. To achieve this goal, IMCA’s Vision & Strategy has been devised with two elements in mind: Core activities and ways of working.
  • IMCA publishes some 200 guidance notes and technical reports – many are available for free downloading by members and non-members alike. These have been developed over the years and are extensively distributed. They are a definition of what IMCA stands for, including widely recognised diving and ROV codes of practice, DP documentation, marine good practice guidance, the Common Marine Inspection Document (CMID) – now available electronically as eCMID, safety recommendations, outline training syllabi and the IMCA competence scheme guidance. In addition to the range of printed guidance documents, IMCA also produces safety promotional materials, circulates information notes and distributes safety flashes.

About the industry IMCA serves
The marine contracting industry plays a vital global role. Its vessels account for 4% of the world’s maritime fleet. Collectively IMCA members employ some 350, 000 people and have an annual turnover of around $150bn. They work in all the world’s major offshore areas, delivering large offshore oil and gas and marine renewables projects around the globe that quite literally fuel the global economy.

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