Sempre La Grecia – Always Greece!

Anniversaries, Art and auctions, Events, Exhibitions, Paintings and Sculpture, People and Places — By on February 24, 2016 at 11:47 PM
The impressive Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti on Venice's Grande Canale

The impressive Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti on Venice’s Grande Canale

In the beautiful and historical Palazzo Cavalli – Franchetti on the west bank of Grande Canale in Venice, during the height of the famous Venetian Carnival, and Valentine’s Day, the Vernissage of the International OpenArtCode Exhibition with the participation of 48 contemporary international artists took place. The exhibition was sponsored by the Banca Intermobiliare di Investimenti e Gestioni; it was also under the auspices of the Greek Consulate in Venice, as well as the Foundation for Greek History.

Because of the links between Venice and Byzantium we believe that there is also a symbolic meaning on these events and exhibitions.

Vitto Abba (Open Art Code), Ivano Masiero and Paulo Guasco from Banca Intermobilare di Investimenti e Gestioni, sponsors of the exhibition

Vitto Abba (Open Art Code), Ivano Masiero and Paulo Guasco from Banca Intermobilare di Investimenti e Gestioni, sponsors of the exhibition

Amongst these 48 artist there were ten Greeks – mainly painters and a sculpture including academics too –Pantelis  Chandris, Jannis Psychopaidis and Andreas Devetzis who together with Mina Kordali, Niki Michailidou, Dimitra Moutzouri,  Maria Mouriadou, Fotini Othoneou, Aspa Papalexandri and Katerina Soroula showed their work under the symbolic title “Sempre la Grecia” or “Greece for Ever”,  as a testimony of a Mediterranean country today, along with messages of tradition and modern expression depicting also actual tendencies in Greece. The videos and installations in the exhibition speak of themselves!

Maria Mouriadou, the Consul of Greece in venice and mrs. Linardakis with Dimitra Moutzouris

Maria Mouriadou, the Consul of Greece in Venice and Mrs. Linardakis with Dimitra Moutzouris

As the art historian and curator of the section” Forever Greece”, Emmy Varouxaki says, “there is a long history of cultural osmosis and acculturation between two sibling civilizations: Greece and Venice.” She continued by saying that “From the time of the Dalmatians when the Greek Community occupied the area of San Zaccaria, the church of San Giorgio dei Greci, the Byzantine Institute and the Greek Consulate, remains there until  today witnessing the glimpse of Venice …overlooking towards  the …gates of Orient, the East…”

Since the first known artist  El Greco came from his native island of Crete to be one of Titian´s students, Greece and Greek artists have been a part of Venice.  Even today, despite the  economic realities and the financial turmoil which has shaken up the entire continent and Greece in particular, people continue to travel to Venice, albeit the difficult challenges, bringing  people with them including the splendid image of Maria Callas, arriving one luminous afternoon to sing at La Fenice Opera…Teatro La Fenice.

Dimitra Moutzouris and one of her paintings

Dimitra Moutzouris and one of her paintings “Diving in the blue”, Oil pastel, 70 x 100cm.

After a great opening/ private view on the 4th of February the event become the talk of the town. The Academia water/bus stop was always packed and the bridge full of visitors too. Needless to say the comments of the shop-owners in Piazza di San Marco!

Well done and many congrats to all involved, particularly to Vitto Abba, Youngsook Park, Emmy Varouxakis, the Greek Consul in Venice, and Mrs. Dimitra Moutzouris in assisting us compile this report; we look forward having a similar event here in London, the metropolis heavily involved with the arts, shipping and Greeks! We remind you that the Open Art Code Group made its presence felt at Oxo Gallery as well as in Paris’ Grand Palais, in Monaco’s Auditorium Rainier III and in the Far East, Shanghai in particular, the Pudong Library and CEIBES!

It seems “odd” and oxymoron – to use a better word, but Greeks thrive on all sectors of life on Planet Ocean, far better than they do inside their Motherland, and despite the  current issues Greece is facing, the world’s most important nation on all counts will always inspire the Mighty Continent and Venice in particular.

Greece will always be part of Europe, part of making the European History in its entirety.

Curator and art critic Emmy Varouxakis with Niki Michailidou and Andriani Markianou

Curator and art critic Emmy Varouxakis with Niki Michailidou and Andriani Markianou

J. Bastakos, Dr. Rarakos, Dimitra Moutzouris, Emmy Varouxakis and hte Rev. Father Ev. Yphantidis of the Greek Orthodox Church in Venice

J. Bastakos, Dr. Rarakos, Dimitra Moutzouris, Emmy Varouxakis and the Rev. Father Ev. Yphantidis of the Greek Orthodox Church in Venice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marco Aurelio Rey Brazil

Marco Aurelio Rey Brazil

Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Franco from  USA

Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Franco from USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viewers can also see a special video herebelow.

Picture credits Dimitra Moutzouris and Anny Zade who also took the video.

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    3 Comments

  • Dimitris says:

    Πολύ ωραίο!

  • Great work of a great team of artist that proves the strong appetite of all Greeks to pass through the crisis. Bravo John Faraclas for your excellent coverage of the story.

  • Suzan Orge Borovas says:

    When you look above the fireplace at the historic Hotel Danieli of Venice, you see a trireme, reminding you of the maritime influence Greeks held in Venetian life. You can transport a whole lot on ships; however, you cannot transport the unique sunshine of Greece; hence, the artist is called on duty. It is hard for the Greek artist to work; the sunshine you see throughout the year invites you outdoors all the time. An artist needs to be a hermit for long stretches of time and produce. I congratulate the artists of this exhibition who translated the light of the sun into their individual works and transported it to Venice. As our Murano glass factory guide dreamed of the day some of the glass sculptures met the Attican sun-his smart sale pitch to my husband-I believe the Venetians met depictions of this light at the exhibit.

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